ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGIONALS
« on: September 23, 2009, 10:40:46 am »
We have a couple Tuesday night Regional CIrcuits lined up in the Rocky Mountains starting with KJAC-KBZN.   Along with the gorgeous scenery and challenging approach's that add to these type of events appeal, there are additional factors that pilots need to prepare for that further enhances the overall satisfaction of flying in these enviroments.  Here are some of those Mountain flying Tips & Considerations::

   Density Altitude- Federal Aviation Regulation 91.116 "Pre-flight Action" requires that a pilot check the density altitude ... DENSITY ALTITUDE IS THE ALTITUDE THE AIRPLANE THINKS IT IS AT, AND PERFORMS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THIS COMPUTED VALUE.
     Density altitude not only affects the takeoff distance and rate of climb, but it also applies to the service ceiling of the airplane while flying en route. It may be possible to fly an airplane with a service ceiling of 12,650 feet toward mountains that top out at 10,000 feet, yet because of density altitude the airplane is unable to clear the mountains.

Mountain Turbulence- Mountain pilots are often exposed to more and usually greater intensity mechanical turbulence than their flatland counterparts, because the obstructions causing the turbulence are larger.  Mountain pilots are also at the mercy of mountain wave turbulence (wind shear). The majority of mountain wave phenomena produces light to moderate turbulence, but some waves produce severe or greater turbulence.
 Turbulence is divided into four degrees of intensity.
⬢   Light ⬠The occupants may be required to use seat belts, but objects in the aircraft remain at rest.
⬢   Moderate ⬠the occupants require seat belts and are occasionally thrown against the belt. Unsecured objects in the aircraft move about.
⬢   Severe ⬠the aircraft may be momentarily out of control. Occupants are thrown violently against the belt and back into the seat. Objects not secured in the aircraft are tossed about.
⬢   Extreme ⬠this is very dangerous level and renders the aircraft almost completely out of control and frequently results in airframe damage and loss of life.

Hypoxia- In most cases, you will be flying at altitudes below those which regulations require oxygen use (above 12,500).  However, even at altitudes from 5,000 ⬠12,500 you can experiences symptoms of hypoxia. Diminished night vision is typically the 1st sign of onset of hypoxia. That is followed by the misleadingly pleasant symptoms of mild alcohol intoxication, becoming clumsy, drowsy, languid and nonchalant.  Now I'm not naming names (LeadBottom) but besides a couple pilots who exhibit that behavior all the time, Our ATC is trained to recognize early hypoxia symptons during comm's and will advise the pilots to correct the situation.
   The longer a pilot stays in an oxygen deprived state the worse the symptons become until finally leading to unconsciousness and death.

KJAC-KBZN
  Either end of this Rocky mountain circuit has you flying into or out of a "hole" with an airport surrounded by mountains. En route you will fly over portions of scenic Tetons and YellowStone national Parks.  Keep an eye out for old faithful erupting on your flight from Jackson Hole to Bozeman and remember to pack your oxygen cylinders as well as your sack lunch.  

-Loctiter

*

Evan Reiter

  • Training Administrator
  • 6263
Re: ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGIONALS
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2009, 02:53:12 pm »
By the way, we're actually going to the Rockies next Tuesday. This week is a good ol' Rc between KJFK & KBOS to give our scenery updates people a bit of a break, and to catch up on some of the events that we are looking at in the future.


Evan Reiter
Training Administrator

Re: ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGIONALS
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2009, 04:46:14 pm »
Glacier Park could be under a winter advisory this Tuesday!
 :shock:
  Keep an eye on the Metar Reports and remember to pack the oxygen bottles. |)

-Loctiter

*

Evan Reiter

  • Training Administrator
  • 6263
Re: ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGIONALS
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2009, 01:08:43 pm »
Keep in mind as well that Glacier Park International (KGPI) recently changed its airport code, which means that the airport in FSX will have the wrong code. The scenery update team was thinking about correcting this, but we were worried that might cause some confusion so...

If you're looking for Glacier Park International on AirNav (or FlightAware, or anywhere else online), you'll need to use the KGPI code. However, in FS (the airport selection page and the GPS), you'll need to use KFCA, which is the old code.


Evan Reiter
Training Administrator